Highgate Area Guide

Introduction to
Highgate, London

Highgate, North London area guide by Goldschmidt and Howland Highgate. Highgate's leading estate agent and letting agent since 1888.

 

The charming and renowned village atmosphere offered by Highgate is attractive to professionals, families and international buyers who are attracted by proximity to Central London and the West End. Highgate’s desirability ensures that prices remain robust, offering all the ideals of village life, with good transport links and amenities such as great schools, attractive green spaces, woodland and a selection of gastropubs. There are also well-loved independent retailers and boutiques within this deep-set community made up from some residents that have been local to the area their whole lives. 

There is no shortage of culture to be charmed by within the area, such as the historical Highgate Literary and Scientific Institution which has been established since 1839 and runs lecture series in a variety of subjects every week.  There is a small award-winning fringe theatre tucked away above the Gatehouse Pub which has its own in-house company and annual programme of shows. For art-lovers, local galleries include Highgate Contemporary Art and the North and South Ideas Gallery, which are both conveniently located on the High Street. On Archway Road, Jacksons Lane Theatre is a creative hub in the area and is home to an array of circus and theatre based performances, including a children’s programme with events throughout the year. 

Transport in Highgate

Highgate tube station is situated in Zone 3 on the High Barnet branch of the Northern Line and is less than 15 minutes walk from Highgate Hill. By Bus, the 271 from Moorgate currently terminates in the Village and the 210 passes through Highgate between Finsbury Park and Brent Cross while the 603 travels up past East Finchley to Muswell Hill on weekdays, mostly serving the school crowd.

 

Schools and Education in Highgate

Primary Schools and Education in Highgate

Independent and Secondary Education in Highgate


Property in Highgate

Highgate is home to an array of properties, from grand Georgian townhouses to world-famous modernist buildings, including what’s rumoured to be the second largest family home after Buckingham Palace, valued at over £300 million, with many of these stunning homes set behind sweeping driveways which lead to charming character period homes. Some of the original village properties date back as early as the late 17th century, forming the foundation of the character of the area.  Home to a number of celebrities, The Grove is one of the oldest roads in the area, offering grand homes, many of which are listed, providing spectacular accommodation and boast west-facing landscaped gardens. Leading off The Grove is the gated Fitzroy Park, a peaceful spot leading down to Highgate ponds and Hampstead Heath. Here you will find a diverse selection of properties ranging from £5-£20 million.  Goldschmidt and Howland are pleased to have sold a property recently with an excess of 12 acres of beautiful green space (details here).

Council Tax Bands for Highgate

Council Tax Annual Rates 2018/2019

A £1,050.53
B £1,225.63
C £1,400.72
D £1,575.80
E £1,925.98
F £2,276.16
G £2,626.34
H £3,151.61

(source Haringey Council)

 

And now for a bit of History on Highgate

Until late Victorian times, Highgate was a distinct village outside London, with a collection of largely Georgian shops, pubs and residential streets. Named due to the connection in land to the Bishop of London’s hunting estate as there was a high ‘deer-proof’ hedge surrounding the estate. Records of Highgate Hill can be dated as far back as 1565, with the village history stretching even further back to the 15th century.

Home to ‘The Flask Pub’ the 18th century destination is rumoured to be one of the most haunted locations in London, and the wine cellar was rumoured hiding place of Dick Turpin when he was on the run from the authorities!

Highgate is often known for ‘Highgate Cemetery’ open since 1839, this intriguing and beautiful site is the final resting place of Karl Marx is rich in history and attracts international visitors. The side was first commissioned for burial use in 1836 to meet the high death rates at the time and the 17 acres of land was then brought by the London Cemetery Company following their creation after an act of parliament for £3,500.